My Adobe FrameMaker journey

As a former Adobe Community Professional (ACP), I used  to post tips and tricks on various Adobe technical communication products. Mostly Adobe RoboHelp and Adobe RoboHelp Server, as I’d used them for over ten years. I’d also participated in beta releases, ensuring problems were discovered (and hopefully fixed) before release.

These days I don’t use any Adobe technical communication product, and had to forfeit  my ACP status. Three years ago I moved jobs to take on a management role, where the team use a community platform to author and host our online documentation. It’s not a perfect solution for my team or our users, but that is about to change. I’ll have more news on this early in 2019.

When I was an ACP, my job didn’t have a great need for Adobe FrameMaker, although we had a licence as part of the Adobe Technical Communication Suite. So when an opportunity came along to learn, I grabbed it with both hands. It involved a project compiling a large process and procedures document.

The initial brief was to author in Microsoft Word until I got involved, but only because they wanted PDF output and the powers that be didn’t know any better. I suggested that Adobe FrameMaker was a better fit, and once I’d explained the benefits this was accepted. I’d dabbled with Adobe FrameMaker in the past, but this gave me the opportunity to learn and use it properly.

Adobe FrameMaker was once described to me as the “Rolls Royce of authoring tools.” I’ve also heard it being called lots of other things, some of which is not repeatable here! I won’t say it’s perfect, well what application is, but a lot of the problems faced by those disgruntled users were caused by poor training or unrealistic expectations.

Part of the reason for this is their previous experience of applications like Microsoft Word. Microsoft were clever to design a product that was easy to use right out of the box. Perhaps too easy. It established a user base among folk who’d never even thought that something would replace the typewriter, let alone used a computer. All of a sudden everyone was creating documents…… badly!

That was OK so long as all they were doing was writing a letter or making notes. Even to this day, PhD students will scream and shout about how poor Microsoft Word is when writing their 300 page thesis. Whilst there are those who swear that Word templates can cope with files that size, it’s not straightforward to your average user.

Adobe FrameMaker does have a steep learning curve. I recommend new users to attend a course, or (like me) buy a good book. It’s well worth it to prevent having to reinvent your templates, and provides many a time saving tip. The Adobe FrameMaker Forums are also well worth visiting, with excellent support from real users.

Whilst I haven’t used Adobe FrameMaker in anger for awhile, I’ve kept a watching eye on its iterations. There’s another release imminent, Adobe FrameMaker 2019, and there’s a webinar planned to showcase what’ included in it. See the link below to register:

https://framemaker-2019-release.meetus.adobeevents.com/

Full details of what will be shown in the webinar is included in the Adobe TechComm blog post at:

https://blogs.adobe.com/techcomm/2018/08/framemaker-2019-release.html

In summary, the release includes:

  • A major platform update, including 64 bit architecture.
  • A new PDF generation engine that negates the need for PostScript or Adobe Distiller processing.
  • UI changes including:
    • A new better organised welcome screen.
    • The return of colour icons, with a choice to revert to monochrome.
    • Changes to make finding a colour or style easier.
  • Additional language support for German (Duden).
  • Improved image handing, including transparency.
  • Improved DITA and XML workflows.
  • Support for Microsoft SharePoint 2016 or SharePoint Online.
  • Support for Adobe Experience Manager 6.4

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